Stay safe in the jungle with these handy tips

Stef Zisovska
 
Trekking in the jungle

Everyone who spends time in the great outdoors needs to learn how to survive in the wilderness. Before you go climbing, hiking, horseback riding, fishing or camping make sure that you have good training in outdoor and survival skills, because the more things you know about how to survive the better, especially in the jungle.

 

 

The big green canopy of trees hides a lot of dangers that can test our limits. The jungle is not a hostile environment, particularly once you’re used to it, but there are some unwanted things that can cause you serious problems during your travels. So, it is important to be well prepared and be ready for a very green, humid, and lively adventure.

 

 

Getting lost in the jungle is not a funny thing, not funny at all, so best avoided. Here are some other important things to remember that can save your life, just in case you get into trouble: Find drinking water, build or find a shelter before the night falls, find a source of food, travel in one direction during daylight hours, keep your lighter waterproof, keep your knife sharp.

 

If it’s the dry season all the small creeks are probably dry and you can’t find a river nearby. Sometimes you can find a thick water vine that will give your body enough water and minerals. If you are in a serious situation, you can dig a hole in a muddy area and wait for it to get full with muddy water, then wait for the mud to settle and after 20 minutes you can drink the water, it will probably taste horrid but it will sustain you.

 

 

Shelter plays a very important role in any jungle survival situation and can be used as protection from many unwanted dangers. Building a shelter should be first on your list of priority actions. A “lean to” shelter is one of the easiest to build in the jungle ” temporary homes.” You need to find a large branch and lean it onto a tree. Then place smaller branches along the length of the large branch, at a 45 degrees angle and then cover the structure with leafs and any other waterproof materials you can find.

A walking stick is a good tool to have when you need to make your way through the various plant and vines that will block your path constantly. Always remember a reference point for where are you starting, this will help keep you from walking in circles.

 

 

As you make your way through the jungle, try to follow animal trails, this may help you get to a river because animals make their way to water sources on a regular basis, or it can lead you to an open jungle area that will increase your chances to be seen by a rescue crew.

Food resources in the jungle are everywhere. Fishing is a good way of getting proteins. Get a long bamboo stalk to use as your spear. Use a knife to cut cross hairs into the tip so that the end of the spear separates into four individual prongs. Separate the prongs with a thin vine to keep them apart. Get into position overlooking the river or stream and wait for a fish to come close to you, then stab down with the spear to catch it.

 

If you see a plant and you are not sure if it’s poisonous it is better not to eat it. The safest plants to eat while you are lost in the jungle are bamboo, fruits that are known to you and palm trees. Before you go into the jungle get an idea of some basics plants so you know what you can eat.

 

Papaya

Be sure that you always have a lighter on you and keep it dry in a plastic tobacco pouch or Ziploc bag. That way you will always have a way to make a fire. There will be resources such as flint and sticks for friction fire lighting, but you will need skills to use them.

Stay safe and dry and always be careful with jungle trips. Respect nature and nature will respect you.

 

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